Problems With Installing Katana

SOLUTION

I’ve had this problem over and over again and I finally figured out how to fix it. So maybe this will make me internet famous.

The take home lesson here though is that FAT16 and FAT32 do not understand Linux file permissions. So you can’t change them on the drive. Well, there’s another lesson here too. Ubuntu doesn’t automatically mount thumb drives with root permission.

I’m going to go into a lot of detail for my own personal edification here.

All these instructions were performed in UBUNTU, but should be similar on other *nix distributions.

STEP 1: Mount the USB Thumb Drive
Plug in USB Thumb Drive
Open Terminal
cd /media (This is where Ubuntu automatically mounts external media)
If you can see the USB’s file system (it’s a folder/directory), perform “umount instert_name_of_folder”
Now perform “sudo mkdir what_ever_your_pleasure”, (I believe it’s necessary to escalate in this area of the file system.)
Here’s where the magic happens, perform “sudo mount /dev/sdb1 whatever_your_pleasure”
The USB Thumb Drive is now mounted to “whatever_your_pleasure” with full privileges.
A little extra note here: /dev is the directory where information on all devices connected to the system is kept. So even if you’re flash drive isn’t mounted, but connected to your PC there should be an sdb1 or sdb whatever number it happens to be in the /dev folder.

STEP 2: Install Katana
The install after this is exactly as the guide says it is.
Navigate to “whatever_your_pleasure/boot”
sudo ./bootinst.sh
Follow on screen instructions
Katana should be installed.
STEP 3: TIDY UP
Navigate to /media
“sudo umount whatever_your_pleasure” to unmount the drive
“sudo rmdir whatever_your_pleasure” to get rid of the directory.

 

 

From:

http://forums.hak5.org/index.php?/topic/20854-problems-with-installing-katana/

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Getting started with OpenVas

Installing OpenVAS

The simplest way of installing all of required parts of the openvas suite is to issue the following commands in a terminal window.

root@bt:~#apt-get update
root@bt:~#apt-get install openvas

The package openvas is a “master” package that holds all of the info required to automatically download all of the other packages that make up the full openvas suite of tools.

Location of OpenVAS menu entries

Once openvas has been installed you will find all the of menu entries in this location.

Openvas3.png

Openvas check setup

openvas-check-setup is a very useful tool, here it is showing how it can help diagnose problems and give advice on how to fix them.

Openvas4.png

Setting up OpenVAS

Step 1. Adding a user

From the menu, select Openvas Adduser and follow instructions.

Openvas5.png

Note that you can use any username you like but in this case I have just used root. I have left it at the default of password authentication as I am going to be using this on a local machine and to save having to worry about the users having certs to worry about, but this is entirely up to you. You cannot have an empty password so I have used toor in this case. For the rules applied to this user I have left them blank by pressing ctrl-d This means that this user will be able to perform any tasks without any restrictions.

Step 2. Making the Certificate

From the menu, select Openvas mkcert and follow instructions.

Here we create the SSL cert This is used if you decided to use cert instead of pass when you created the user, but you are required to create it anyway even if you decide not to use certs.

Step 3. Syncing the NVT’s

At this point we need to get the latest set of nvt’s. These are what the scanner uses to detect the vulnerabilities in what you are scanning. Please note you will need to do this quite regularly, and the first time you do it could take a while depending on the speed of your computer and internet.

So select OpenVAS NVT Sync from the menu

Step 4. Starting the scanner

Start Openvas scanner

Now we are ready to start the scanner

This WILL take a while the first time you start it as it checks and loads the new NVT’s you have downloaded in the previous step.

Openvas8.png
Openvas9.png

Note the time in the corner ! This was in a VM so it should be much quicker for you.

Subsequent starts will be quick unless you have not updated in quite some time

Please remember that the scanner runs as a daemon in the background and will keep running until you reboot or stop it with the menu entry provided.

Step 5. Setup OpenVAS manager

Setting up openvas manager

First thing we need to do is make a client cert for Openvas manager, This is done by running the following command

openvas-mkcert-client -n om -i

Openvas10.png

now we need to rebuild the database as it is now out of date with the added nvt’s and we would otherwise get errors about the database. You should do this each time you update the NVT’s. This is done with a simple command

openvasmd --rebuild

This process will only take a few seconds if using openvas-libraries version 4.0.3 or below.

This process can take much longer if using openvas-libraries version 4.0.5 or above. The tradeoff for this extra time is much greater scanning capabilities, so it is worth it.

Step 6. Setup OpenVAS Administrator

Setting up Openvas Administrator

We need to create an administrative user that we will be using to perform all of our vulnerability assesments. This is done by running the following command

openvasad -c 'add_user' -n openvasadmin -r Admin

openvasadmin is the username I have chosen to become this user, you however can substitute that with something better suited to you if you so choose. Make sure you can remember this username and associated password as you WILL need it when running openvas.

root@bt:~# openvasad -c 'add_user' -n openvasadmin -r Admin
Enter password: 
ad   main:MESSAGE:5871:2011-05-26 04h57.08 BST: No rules file provided, the new user will have no restrictions.
ad   main:MESSAGE:5871:2011-05-26 04h57.08 BST: User openvasadmin has been successfully created.
root@bt:~#

Starting OpenVAS Manager

Now we need to start Openvas Manager

This runs as a daemon in the background. As I am running everything from my local machine I will be using localhost to listen on and in this case the default port. This is done by running the following command.

openvasmd -p 9390 -a 127.0.0.1

Starting OpenVAS Administrator

Now we need to start Openvas Administrator

This also runs as a daemon in the background. As I am running everything from my local machine I will be using localhost to listen on and in this case the default port. This is done by running the following command.

openvasad -a 127.0.0.1 -p 9393

Starting Greenbone Security Assistant

Now we need to start Greenbone security Assistant

This again runs as a daemon in the background. As I am running everything from my local machine I will be using localhost to listen on and in this case the default port. This is done by running the following command.

gsad --http-only --listen=127.0.0.1 -p 9392

More info on the above commands and other options can be found by running their associated menu entry and by looking at the man pages. As all three of these run as a daemon and will continue running until you shutdown you computer, I have provided menu entries for you so as you can stop them when you no longer need them.

 

At this point your installation is essentially complete, but as we have got this far we may as well continue to make sure everything is working as expected.

OpenVAS user interfaces

Greenbone security desktop

Now we need to start an application to enable you to communicate with the scanner and other daemons.

The first of these choices is greenbone security desktop

Start this from the menu item and fill in the credentials and details we created earlier, then click the login button.

Openvas11.png
Once logged in you can use this as your scanning interface, or use the next choice of you prefer.

Web interface

This next method is via a web interface

Open your favorite browser and enter the following address

127.0.0.1:9392

You will then be presented with a login page. login with the credentials we created earlier.

Once you have logged in, you will notice that your CPU usage will hit the roof, don’t worry, this will return to normal in short while.

Openvas12.png

Here you can perform and setup all of your scanning tasks. It is a good idea to set NoScript to Temporarily allow 127.0.0.1 or you may get unexpected results.

There is much more to OpenVAS than I have included here, but this is only intended to get you up and running quickly. Scans and more advanced setups are beyond the scope of this simple tutorial. Don’t forget about some of the other parts to openvas contained within the menu that I have not covered here and also the man pages.

 

Once you have completed the setup process

Starting OpenVAS with greenbone security desktop as the scanning interface

From the menu select

Openvas NVT sync

Start Openvas scanner

then in a terminal window

openvasmd --rebuild
openvasmd -p 9390 -a 127.0.0.1
openvasad -a 127.0.0.1 -p 9393
gsad --http-only --listen=127.0.0.1 -p 9392

Then from the menu

Start Greenbone Security Desktop

and login

You are now ready to setup your scanning tasks.

Starting OpenVAS with a web browser as the scanning interface

From the menu select

Openvas NVT sync

Start Openvas scanner

then in a terminal window

openvasmd --rebuild
openvasmd -p 9390 -a 127.0.0.1
openvasad -a 127.0.0.1 -p 9393
gsad --http-only --listen=127.0.0.1 -p 9392

Then open your browser to the address

http://127.0.0.1:9392

Login.

You are now ready to setup your scanning tasks.

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Quick Tips for Administering Windows Server Core 2008

Quick Tips for Administering Windows Server Core 2008

http://www.veritablelife.com/2009/02/17/quick-tips-for-administering-windows-server-core-2008/

 

I recently added a Windows Server Core 2008 server to my fleet of servers. There is a huge difference between Server and Server Core, and that difference is that Server Core doesn’t have a graphical user interface. Since most people who administer a Windows network are used to a point and click environment, I wanted to share some quick tips on some command line administration that may be helpful for those Windows System Admins out there. The six main areas that I would like to talk about are: Windows Updates,Restarting the Server, Logging Off, Setting a Static IP Address, Joining a Domain, and Promoting the Server to a Domain Controller.

Windows Updates

The first thing that I do whenever I deploy a new server is to make sure that it has the latest updates and patches. To perform this task on Server Core it takes a few extra steps.

  1. Create WUA_SearchDownloadInstall.vbs on a client computer and save on the C Drive. To create this file you will need to either download it here, or go to Microsoft’s site and copy and paste the script into a text editor and save it as a VBS.
  2. From your Server Core computer, connect to the client computer’s hard drive:
    - NET USE command: net use X: \\CLIENT\C$ /USER:DOMAIN\Username
    - PUSHD command: PUSHD \\CLIENT\C$
  3. Copy the WUA_SearchDownloadInstall.vbsfrom the client to the C drive of the server:
    - COPY X:\WUA_SearchDownloadInstall.vbs C:\
  4. Disconnect from the client computer’s hard drive:
    - NET USE command: net use X: /delete
    - POPD command: popd
  5. Run the WUA_SearchDownloadInstall.vbs script via CSCRIPT:
    - cscript WUA_SearchDownloadInstall.vbs
  6. Answer questions at each prompt, and your done!

Restarting the Computer

Restarting a server was easy when there was a GUI, you would click start, go to shutdown, and select the restart option. In Server Core, it’s even easier. To perform a restart, or shutdown, you are going to use the SHUTDOWN command:

  • Restart Server: shutdown /r /f
  • Shutdown Server: shutdown /f

These are simple examples of how to shutdown and restart, for a more extensive look at what you can do to shutdown go to the SHUTDOWN command help menu:

- shutdown /?

Logging Off

Just like restarting a server, logging off of Windows Server Core is easier that it was back in the GUI days. To log off simply type the following command:

- logoff

Setting a Static IP Address

To set a static IP address on a Server Core installation of Windows is a bit trickier than our previous administrative tasks. To set an IP address of a server, we will use the NETSH command. To perform this task follow these steps:

  1. Determine the Interface Name (IntName) of your NIC:
    - netsh interface show interface
  2. Set the IP Address (IP), Subnet Mask (SM) and Default Gateway (DG):
    - netsh interface ipv4 set address name="IntName" source=static
      address=IP mask=SM gateway=DG
  3. Configure the DNS Options for the first DNS Server, with the DNS Server’s IP Address (DNSIP):
    - netsh interface ipv4 add dnsserver name="IntName" address=DNSIP index=1
  4. To configure the DNS Options for the other DNS Servers, use the same command but increase the “index=1? to either 2, 3 or 4.
  5. Run an IPCONFIG to verify that you have the proper settings:
    - ipconfig /all

Joining a Domain

In order to add your new Server Core server to your domain, you need to use the NETDOM command. We will first need the following information, the domain which you want to join (<dn>) and the user account that you would wish to use to authenicate the Server Core to the Domain (<un>). Once we have this information, type the following command:

- netdom join %computername% /Domain:<dn> /UserD:<un> /PasswordD:* /REBoot

Promoting the Server to a Domain Controller

I have saved the most fun for last. In previous versions of Windows, it was easy to promote a server to be a Domain Controller; Microsoft provided us with a nice GUI and made it easy. In Server Core it become a bit more tedious. To perform the this, we will use the DCPROMO command, which will be accomplished by following these steps:

  1. Perform a Forest Prep and a Domain Prep. This will require the Windows Server 2008 installation disk. Located on the disk, under “<Disk Drive>:\Sources\ADPrep\” is a program call ADPrep.exe. From a current domain controller, perform the following steps at the command prompt:
    - <Disk Drive>:\sources\ADPrep\adprep.exe /forestprep
    - <Disk Drive>:\sources\ADPrep\adprep.exe /domainprep
  2. Once the Active Directory Forest and Domain are prepared, it is time to promote your Server Core. Prior to promoting the server you need to create an unattend text file from a client computer with the following information:
    [Unattend]
    Unattendmode = fullunattend
    [DCINSTALL]
    UserDomain=<domain>
    SafeModeAdminPassword=<Password>
    ReplicaOrNewDomain=Replica
    ReplicationSourceDC=<Current Domain Controller>
    ReplicaDomainDNSName=<domain>
    RebootOnCompletion=Yes

    Save this file as “unattend.txt” and make sure that it is accessible from your Server Core server.

  3. Last but not least, we will run DCPROMO from the Server Core server:
    - dcpromo /unattend:unattend.txt

Those are my quick administration tips for managing a Windows Server Core server. Hope this article has been helpful.

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Searching, Downloading, and Installing Updates on Windows 2008 Core

Searching, Downloading, and Installing Updates

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa387102(VS.85).aspx

The scripting sample in this topic shows you how to use Windows Update Agent (WUA) to scan, download, and install updates.

The sample searches for all the applicable software updates and then lists those updates. Next, it creates a collection of updates to download and then downloads them. Finally, it creates a collection of updates to install and then installs them.

If you want to search, download, and install a specific update that you identify by using the update title, see Searching, Downloading, and Installing Specific Updates.

Before you attempt to run this sample, note the following:

  • WUA must be installed on the computer. For more information about how to determine the version of WUA that is installed, see Determining the Current Version of WUA.
  • The sample can download updates only by using WUA. It cannot download updates from a Software Update Services (SUS) 1.0 server.
  • Running this sample requires Windows Script Host (WSH). For more information about WSH, see the WSH section of the Platform Software Development Kit (SDK). If the sample is copied to a file named WUA_SearchDownloadInstall.vbs, you can run the sample by opening a Command Prompt window and typing the following command at the command prompt.

    cscript WUA_SearchDownloadInstall.vbs

Example

Set updateSession = CreateObject("Microsoft.Update.Session")
updateSession.ClientApplicationID = "MSDN Sample Script"

Set updateSearcher = updateSession.CreateUpdateSearcher()

WScript.Echo "Searching for updates..." & vbCRLF

Set searchResult = _
updateSearcher.Search("IsInstalled=0 and Type='Software' and IsHidden=0")

WScript.Echo "List of applicable items on the machine:"

For I = 0 To searchResult.Updates.Count-1
    Set update = searchResult.Updates.Item(I)
    WScript.Echo I + 1 & "> " & update.Title
Next

If searchResult.Updates.Count = 0 Then
    WScript.Echo "There are no applicable updates."
    WScript.Quit
End If

WScript.Echo vbCRLF & "Creating collection of updates to download:"

Set updatesToDownload = CreateObject("Microsoft.Update.UpdateColl")

For I = 0 to searchResult.Updates.Count-1
    Set update = searchResult.Updates.Item(I)
    addThisUpdate = false
    If update.InstallationBehavior.CanRequestUserInput = true Then
        WScript.Echo I + 1 & "> skipping: " & update.Title & _
        " because it requires user input"
    Else
        If update.EulaAccepted = false Then
            WScript.Echo I + 1 & "> note: " & update.Title & _
            " has a license agreement that must be accepted:"
            WScript.Echo update.EulaText
            WScript.Echo "Do you accept this license agreement? (Y/N)"
            strInput = WScript.StdIn.Readline
            WScript.Echo 
            If (strInput = "Y" or strInput = "y") Then
                update.AcceptEula()
                addThisUpdate = true
            Else
                WScript.Echo I + 1 & "> skipping: " & update.Title & _
                " because the license agreement was declined"
            End If
        Else
            addThisUpdate = true
        End If
    End If
    If addThisUpdate = true Then
        WScript.Echo I + 1 & "> adding: " & update.Title 
        updatesToDownload.Add(update)
    End If
Next

If updatesToDownload.Count = 0 Then
    WScript.Echo "All applicable updates were skipped."
    WScript.Quit
End If

WScript.Echo vbCRLF & "Downloading updates..."

Set downloader = updateSession.CreateUpdateDownloader() 
downloader.Updates = updatesToDownload
downloader.Download()

Set updatesToInstall = CreateObject("Microsoft.Update.UpdateColl")

rebootMayBeRequired = false

WScript.Echo vbCRLF & "Successfully downloaded updates:"

For I = 0 To searchResult.Updates.Count-1
    set update = searchResult.Updates.Item(I)
    If update.IsDownloaded = true Then
        WScript.Echo I + 1 & "> " & update.Title 
        updatesToInstall.Add(update)	
        If update.InstallationBehavior.RebootBehavior > 0 Then
            rebootMayBeRequired = true
        End If
    End If
Next

If updatesToInstall.Count = 0 Then
    WScript.Echo "No updates were successfully downloaded."
    WScript.Quit
End If

If rebootMayBeRequired = true Then
    WScript.Echo vbCRLF & "These updates may require a reboot."
End If

WScript.Echo  vbCRLF & "Would you like to install updates now? (Y/N)"
strInput = WScript.StdIn.Readline
WScript.Echo 

If (strInput = "Y" or strInput = "y") Then
    WScript.Echo "Installing updates..."
    Set installer = updateSession.CreateUpdateInstaller()
    installer.Updates = updatesToInstall
    Set installationResult = installer.Install()

    'Output results of install
    WScript.Echo "Installation Result: " & _
    installationResult.ResultCode 
    WScript.Echo "Reboot Required: " & _ 
    installationResult.RebootRequired & vbCRLF 
    WScript.Echo "Listing of updates installed " & _
    "and individual installation results:" 

    For I = 0 to updatesToInstall.Count - 1
        WScript.Echo I + 1 & "> " & _
        updatesToInstall.Item(i).Title & _
        ": " & installationResult.GetUpdateResult(i).ResultCode 		
    Next
End If

 

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Administering a Server 2008 Core installation

From http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee441258(v=ws.10)

The commands are grouped into the following sections:

  • Configuration and installation

  • Networking and firewall

  • Updates and error reporting

  • Services, processes and performance

  • Event logs

  • Disk and file system

  • Hardware

  • Remote administration

Prerequisites for administering a Server Core installation


To complete this task, you need:

  • A computer on which you have installed and configured a Server Core installation of Windows Server 2008.
  • An administrator user account and password for the server running a Server Core installation.

Known issues for administering a Server Core installation


  • Server Core installation supports Windows Installer in quiet mode so that you can install tools and utilities from Windows Installer files.
  • If you need to write a script for managing a server running a Server Core installation, which requires the secure inclusion of an administrative password, see the scripting column on Microsoft TechNet (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=56421).

Steps for administering a Server Core installation


The following procedures summarize common administrator tasks for a server running a Server Core installation.

Many of these procedures and commands are summarized in a job aid that you can download and print to take with you for use in the field. Separate versions for Windows Server 2008 and Windows Server 2008 R2 are available at http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=151984.

Task Steps
Set the local administrative password At a command prompt, type:

net user administrator *

Join a computer to a domain
  1. At a command prompt, type on one line:

    netdom join %computername% /domain:<domain> /userd:<domain>\username> /passwordd:*

  2. Restart the computer.
Confirm that the domain has changed At a command prompt, type:

set

Remove a computer from a domain At a command prompt, type:

netdom remove

Add a user to the local Administrators group. At a command prompt, type:

net localgroup Administrators /add <domain>\<username>

Remove a user from the local Administrators group At a command prompt, type:

net localgroup Administrators /delete <domain\username>

Add a user to the local computer At a command prompt, type:

net user <domain\user name> /add *

Add a group to the local computer At a command prompt, type:

net localgroup <group name> /add

Change the name of a domain-joined computer At a command prompt, type:

netdom renamecomputer %computername% /NewName:<new computer name> /userd:<domain\username> /passwordd:*

Confirm the new computer name At a command prompt, type:

set

Change the name of a computer in a work group
  1. At a command prompt, type:

    netdom renamecomputer <currentcomputername> /NewName:<newcomputername>

  2. Restart the computer.
Disable paging file management At a command prompt, type:

wmic computersystem where name=”<computername>” set AutomaticManagedPagefile=False

Configure the paging file At a command prompt, type:

wmic pagefileset where name=”<path/filename>” set InitialSize=<initialsize>,MaximumSize=<maxsize>

Where:

path/filename is the path to and name of the paging file

initialsize is the starting size of the paging file in bytes.

maxsize is the maximum size of the page file in bytes.

Change to a static IP address.
  1. At a command prompt, type:

    ipconfig /all

  2. Record the relevant information or redirect it to a text file (ipconfig /all >ipconfig.txt).
  3. At a command prompt, type:

    netsh interface ipv4 show interfaces 

  4. Verify that there is an interface list.
  5. At a command prompt, type:

    netsh interface ipv4 set address name <ID from interface list> source=static address=<preferred IP address> gateway=<gateway address>

  6. Verify by typing ipconfig /all at a command prompt and checking that DHCP enabled is set to No.
Set a static DNS address.
  1. At a command prompt, type:

    netsh interface ipv4 add dnsserver name=<name of primary DNS server> address=<IP address of the primary DNS server> index=1

  2. At a command prompt, type:

    netsh interface ipv4 add dnsserver name=<name of secondary DNS server> address=<IP address of the secondary DNS server> index=2

  3. Repeat as appropriate to add additional servers.
  4. Verify by typing ipconfig /all and checking that all the addresses are correct.
Change to a DHCP-provided IP address from a static IP address.
  1. At a command prompt, type:

    netsh interface ipv4 set address name=<IP address of local system> source=DHCP

  2. Verify by typing Ipconfig /all and checking that DCHP enabled is set to Yes.
Enter a product key At a command prompt, type:

slmgr.vbs –ipk <product key>

Activate the server locally. At a command prompt, type:

slmgr.vbs -ato

Activate the server remotely.
  1. At a command prompt, type:

    cscript slmgr.vbs –ipk <product key><server name><username><password>

  2. At a command prompt, type:

    cscript slmgr.vbs -ato <servername> <username> <password>

  3. Retrieve the GUID of the computer by typing cscript slmgr.vbs -did
  4. Type cscript slmgr.vbs -dli <GUID>
  5. Verify that License status is set to Licensed (activated).
noteNote
If Slmgr.vbs fails to activate the computer, the resulting error message advises you to run Slui.exe, along with the error code for more information. Slui.exe is not included in Server Core installations—it is available in Windows Vista, Windows 7,and full installations of Windows Server 2008 and Windows Server 2008 R2. 

 

Networking and firewall


Task Steps
Configure your server to use a proxy server. At a command prompt, type:

netsh Winhttp set proxy <servername>:<port number>

noteNote
Server Core installations cannot access the Internet through a proxy that requires a password to allow connections. 

 

 

Configure your server to bypass the proxy for internet addresses. At a command prompt, type:

netsh winttp set proxy <servername>:<port number>bypass-list=”<local>”

Display or modify IPSEC configuration. At a command prompt, type:

netsh ipsec

Display or modify NAP configuration. At a command prompt, type:

netsh nap

Display or modify IP to physical address translation. At a command prompt, type:

arp

Display or configure the local routing table. At a command prompt, type:

route

View or configure DNS server settings. At a command prompt, type:

nslookup

Display protocol statistics and current TCP/IP network connections. At a command prompt, type:

netstat

Display protocol statistics and current TCP/IP connections using NetBIOS over TCP/IP (NBT). At a command prompt, type:

nbtstat

Display hops for network connections. At a command prompt, type:

pathping

Trace hops for network connections. At a command prompt, type:

tracert

Display the configuration of the multicast router. At a command prompt, type:

mrinfo

Enable remote administration of the firewall. At a command prompt, type:

netsh advfirewall firewall set rule group=”Windows Firewall Remote Management” new enable=yes

Updates, error reporting, and feedback


Task Steps
Install an update. At a command prompt, type:

wusa <update>.msu /quiet

List installed updates At a command prompt, type:

systeminfo

Remove an update.
  1. Type at a command prompt:

    expand /f:* <update>.msu c:\test

  2. Navigate to c:\test\ and open <update>.xml in a text editor.
  3. In <update>.xml, replace Install with Remove and save the file.
  4. At a command prompt, type:

    pkgmgr /n:<update>.xml

Configure automatic updates. At a command prompt:

  • To verify the current setting, type:

    cscript scregedit.wsf /AU /v

  • To enable automatic updates, type:

    cscript scregedit.wsf /AU 4 

  • To disable automatic updates, type:

    cscript scregedit.wsf /AU 1 

Enable error reporting. At a command prompt:

  • To verify the current setting, type: serverWerOptin /query
  • To automatically send detailed reports, type:

    serverWerOptin /detailed

  • To automatically send summary reports, type:

    serverWerOptin /summary

  • To disable error reporting, type: serverWerOptin /disable
Participate in the Customer Experience Improvement Program (CEIP). At a command prompt:

  • To verify the current setting, type:

    serverCEIPOptin /query

  • To enable CEIP, type:

    serverCEIPOptin /enable

  • To disable CEIP, type:

    serverCEIPOptin /disable

Services, processes, and performance


Task Steps
List the running services. At a command prompt, type either of the following:

  • sc query
  • net start
Start a service. At a command prompt, type either of the following:

  • sc start <service name>
  • net start <service name>
Stop a service. At a command prompt, type either of the following:

  • sc stop <service name>
  • net stop <service name>
Retrieve a list of running applications and associated processes. At a command prompt, type:

tasklist

Stop a process forcibly.
  1. Use the tasklist command to retrieve the process ID (PID).
  2. At a command prompt, type:

    taskkill /PID <process ID>

Start Task Manager. At a command prompt, type:

taskmgr

Manage the performance counters and logging with commands such as typeperflogmanrelogtracerprt. See http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=84872.

Event logs


Task Steps
List event logs. At a command prompt, type:

wevtutil el

Query events in a specified log. At a command prompt, type:

wevtutil qe /f:text <log name>

Export an event log. At a command prompt, type:

wevtutil epl <log name>

Clear an event log. At a command prompt, type:

wevtutil cl <log name>

Disk and file system


Task Steps
Manage disk partitions. For a complete list of commands, at a command prompt, type:

diskpart /?

Manage software RAID. For a complete list of commands, at a command prompt, type:

diskraid /?

Manage volume mount points. For a complete list of commands, at a command prompt, type:

mountvol /?

Defragment a volume. For a complete list of commands, at a command prompt, type:

defrag /?

Convert a volume to the NTFS file system. At a command prompt, type:

convert <volume letter> /FS:NTFS

Compact a file. For a complete list of commands, at a command prompt, type:

compact /?

Administer open files. For a complete list of commands, at a command prompt, type:

openfiles /?

Administer VSS folders. For a complete list of commands, at a command prompt, type:

vssadmin /?

Administer the file system. For a complete list of commands, at a command prompt, type:

fsutil /?

Verify a file signature. At a command prompt, type:

sigverif /?

Take ownership of a file or folder. For a complete list of commands, at a command prompt, type:

icacls /?

Hardware


Task Steps
Add a driver for a new hardware device.
  1. Copy the driver to a folder at %homedrive%\<driver folder>.
  2. At a command prompt, type:

    pnputil -i -a %homedrive%\<driver folder>\<driver>.inf

Remove a driver for a hardware device.
  1. For a list of loaded drivers, at a command prompt, type:

    sc query type= driver

  2. At the command prompt, type:

    sc delete <service_name>

 

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Filed under Operating Systems, Windows

How to Enable Remote Desktop Connections on Server Core 2008

At the command prompt type:

CD\Windows\System32
cscript scregedit.wsf /ar 0

If you typed it correctly it will display:

Microsoft Windows Script Host Version 5.7
Copyright (C) Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

Registry has been updated..

Next type:

cscript scregedit.wsf /ar /v

If you did things correctly the server will output:

Microsoft (R) Windows Script Host Version 5.7
Copyright (C) Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server fDenyTSConnections
View registry setting.
0

Next you will have to make sure that the firewall on the server has the propper ports opened to allow remote connections through. You do this by running another command.

C:\Windows\System32>netsh firewall set service type=remotedesktop mode=enable

If done correct it will output: ok

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How to reset WordPress admin password from cPanel?

How to reset WordPress admin password from cPanel?

You have to do this through the WordPress database directly.

The most convenient way to manage the database is via the phpMyAdmin tool.

Goto your cPanel -> MySQL Databases section.

Scroll down the page till you notice the small phpMyAdmin link.

Click on it.

or

Goto your cPanel –>Databases –> phpMyAdmin

Once you are logged in to phpMyAdmin, select the WordPress database from the drop-down menu from left sidebar.

The page will refresh and the database tables will be displayed on it.

Open the SQL tab (look at the top navigation bar).

In the text field write the following SQL query:

UPDATE `wp_users` SET `user_pass` = MD5( ‘new_password_here’ ) WHERE `wp_users`.`user_login` = “admin_username”;

“new_password_here” – replace this with the new password you wish to use.

“admin_username” – replace this with the username the password should be updated for.

Once you are ready, click on the GO button to submit the query. If everything goes fine without errors, you should be able to login to WordPress with your new password.

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Filed under Datacenters, Linux/Unix

How to reset the password on a tripwire agent

Your server is unable to authenticate the client? Simply, you may have the wrong password on the client agent.

Go to:

C:\Program Files\Tripwire\TE\Agent\bin>

Then type:

tetool.cmd setchannelpass expectedpassword expectedpassword

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Filed under Datacenters, Online Security

Managing Windows User Accounts using command line

 

From:

http://windowscommand.uw.hu/wincmd0071.html

Managing User Accounts

Managing user accounts from the command line is different from managing them in the Active Directory Users And Computers administrative tool, chiefly because you have more options and it is easier to work with multiple user accounts at the same time.

Viewing and Finding User Accounts

You can use the DSQUERY USER command to search for users. Not only can you search by common name, SAM account name, and description, but you can also use wildcards in any of these fields to facilitate matches. The output of DSQUERY USER contains the DNs of users that match the search criteria and can be piped as input to other commands, including DSGET USER, which you can use in turn to display user account properties.

DSQUERY USER and DSGET USER are best used together. Here, you use DSQUERY USER to obtain the DNs for one or more users, and then use DSGET USER to display the properties for the related accounts. Using DSGET USER, properties you can display are specified by using parameters, including

  • display Displays the full name attribute of matching user accounts in the output

  • desc Displays the description of matching user accounts in the output

  • dn Displays the distinguished name of matching user accounts in the output

  • empid Displays the employee ID attribute of matching user accounts in the output

  • fn Displays the first name attribute of matching user accounts in the output

  • mi Displays the middle initial attribute of matching user accounts in the output

  • samid Displays the SAM account name of matching user accounts in the output

  • sid Displays the security identifier for matching user accounts in the output

  • disabled Displays a Yes/No value indicating whether the user account is disabled

DSGET USER displays output in table format. Generally speaking, you will always want to use –Dn, –Samid or –Display as a parameter to help you make sense of and identify the users in the output. For example, if you wanted to search for all engineering users that were disabled, you can use the command line

dsquery user "OU=Eng,DC=cpandl,DC=com" | dsget user -dn -disabled

Here, you list the disabled status of each user in the Engineering OU of the cpandl.com domain, such as

  dn                                         disabled
CN=edwardh,OU=Eng,DC=cpandl,DC=com yes
CN=jacobl,OU=Eng,DC=cpandl,DC=com yes
CN=maryk,OU=Eng,DC=cpandl,DC=com yes
CN=ellene,OU=Eng,DC=cpandl,DC=com yes
CN=williams,OU=Eng,DC=cpandl,DC=com yes
dsget succeeded

You could also display the SAM account name as shown in this example:

dsquery user -name william* | dsget user -samid -disabled
samid disabled
williamb yes
williamd yes
williams no
dsget succeeded

Here, you search for all user accounts whose common name begins with William, then display the SAM account name and disabled status of each.

Determining Group Membership for Individual User Accounts

You can use the second syntax for DSGET USER to obtain the group membership of individual user accounts. For example, if you wanted to see what groups WilliamS is a member of, you could type the command

dsquery user -name williams | dsget user -memberof

or

dsget user "CN=William Stanek,OU=Eng,DC=cpandl,DC=com" -memberof

Both commands work the same. In the first example, you use DSQUERY USER to obtain the DN of the user account. In the second example, you specify the DN directly. Either way, the output would show the group memberships, such as

"CN=Tech,CN=Users,DC=cpandl,DC=com"
"CN=Engineering,OU=Eng,DC=cpandl,DC=com"
"CN=Domain Users,CN=Users,DC=cpandl,DC=com"

Here, the user is a member of the Tech, Engineering, and Domain Users groups.

While this technique could be used to display the membership of multiple users, there is no way to display a DN or SAM account name for the associated users. Thus, you get a list of group memberships and the only indicator that the memberships are for different users are the blank lines in the listing. For example, if you used the query

dsquery user -name bill* | dsget user -memberof

the output might look like this:

"CN=Tech,CN=Users,DC=cpandl,DC=com"
"CN=Engineering,OU=Eng,DC=cpandl,DC=com"
"CN=Domain Users,CN=Users,DC=cpandl,DC=com"

"CN=Domain Users,CN=Users,DC=cpandl,DC=com"

"CN=Tech,CN=Users,DC=cpandl,DC=com"
"CN=Engineering,OU=Eng,DC=cpandl,DC=com"
"CN=Domain Users,CN=Users,DC=cpandl,DC=com"

"CN=Engineering,OU=Eng,DC=cpandl,DC=com"
"CN=Domain Users,CN=Users,DC=cpandl,DC=com"

"CN=Tech,CN=Users,DC=cpandl,DC=com"
"CN=Engineering,OU=Eng,DC=cpandl,DC=com"
"CN=Domain Users,CN=Users,DC=cpandl,DC=com"

"CN=Domain Users,CN=Users,DC=cpandl,DC=com"

"CN=Domain Users,CN=Users,DC=cpandl,DC=com"

Here, you have output for seven user accounts. You can tell this because of the blank lines separating each group membership listing. But you have no indication of which user accounts the entries specifically relate.

Setting or Changing User Account Attributes

From the command line, it is a swift and easy matter to set or change user account attributes using the DSMOD USER command. You can, in fact, set attributes for one or many users at the same time. Suppose that you want all 150 users in the Sales OU to have their department attribute set as “Sales & Marketing,” their company attribute set as “City Power and Light,” and their title set to “Customer Sales.” You can do this with a single command-line entry:

dsquery user "OU=Sales,DC=cpandl,DC=com" | dsmod user -dept "Sales & 
Marketing" -company "City Power and Light" -title "Customer Sales"

The DSMOD USER command would then report the individual success or failure of each change:

dsmod succeeded:CN=edwardh,OU=Sales,DC=cpandl,DC=com   no
dsmod succeeded:CN=erinp,OU=Sales,DC=cpandl,DC=com no
dsmod succeeded:CN=jayo,OU=Sales,DC=cpandl,DC=com no
dsmod succeeded:CN=johng,OU=Sales,DC=cpandl,DC=com yes
...
dsmod succeeded:CN=williams,OU=Sales,DC=cpandl,DC=com yes

Although changing these values in the GUI could take you hours, the entire process from the command line takes only a few minutes. You simply type the command-line entry and let DSMOD USER do the work for you.

Other parameters that you’ll work with frequently include

  • webpg Sets an intranet or Internet address that will appear in the directory listing for the associated user, such as \\Intranet\Sales.

  • profile Sets the path to the user’s profile, which provides the environment settings for user accounts, such as \\Gamma\Profiles\wrstanek.

  • hmdrv Sets the drive letter of the user’s home directory, such as X:. The user’s home directory will be mapped to this drive letter.

  • hmdir Sets the home directory for the user, such as \\Gamma\Users
    \wrstanek.

Caution

Generally, you don’t want to change user profile paths, home drives, or home directories when users are logged on, because this might cause problems. So you might want to update this information after hours or ask the user to log off for a few minutes and then log back on.

Tip

By default, if an error occurs when processing changes, DSMOD USER will halt execution and report the error. Generally, this is the behavior you want, because you don’t want to make improper changes. You can, however, use the –C parameter to tell DSMOD USER to report the error but continue.

These parameters accept the special value $username$. This value lets you assign paths and filenames that are based on individual user names. For example, if you assign the home directory path as \\Gamma\Users\$username$\ or C:\Home\$username$, Windows replaces the $username$ value with the actual user name—and it does so for each user you’re managing. This would mean if you are working with the accounts for erinb, sandyr, miked and kyler, they would all be assigned unique home directories—either \\Gama\Users\erinb, \\Gama\Users\sandyr, \\Gama\Users\miked and \\Gama\Users\kyler or C:\Home\erinb, C:\Home\sandyr, C:\Home\miked and C:\Home\kyler. In these examples, \\Gama\Users is a path to a network share and C:\Home represents a directory on the user’s computer.

Following this, you could set the Web page, profile, home drive, and home directory for all users in the Sales OU by typing

dsquery user "OU=Sales,DC=cpandl,DC=com" | dsmod user -webpg 
\\Intranet\Sales\$username$ - profile "\\corpdc02\sales\$username$"
-hmdrv "X:" -hmdir "\\corpserver01\users\$username$"
Real World

With The Active Directory Users And Computers administrative tool, you enter the value %username% to get paths and filename based on individual user names. Don’t use this value with the special parameters discussed here. %username% is an environment variable and the GUI knows to replace the environment variable on a per-user basis. The command line interprets this and other environment variables based on the current logged on user, however. So in this case the value of %username% is the SAM account name of the user account under which you run the command.

Disabling and Enabling User Accounts

You can enable or disable users accounts from the command line using the DSMOD USER command and the –Disabled parameter. Use –disabled yes to disable the user account and –disabled no to enable the user account.

In the following example, you disable all users in the OffsiteUsers OU:

dsquery user "OU=OffsiteUsers,DC=cpandl,DC=com" | dsmod user -disabled 

yes

The DSMOD USER command would then report the individual success or failure of each change.

Resetting Expired User Accounts

Domain user accounts can be set with a specific expiration date. You can check the account expiration date using DSGET USER with the –Acctexpires parameter. For example, if you wanted to check the expiration date of all user accounts in the Sales OU, you can type

dsquery user "OU=Sales,DC=cpandl,DC=com" | dsget user -dn -acctexpires

The resulting output would show you the account expiration dates of each account in the Sales OU according to the distinguished name of the account, such as

  dn                                               acctexpires
CN=Mary Baker,OU=Sales,DC=cpandl,DC=com never
CN=Bradley Beck,OU=Sales,DC=cpandl,DC=com 11/15/2006
CN=Ann Bebbe,OU=Sales,DC=cpandl,DC=com never
CN=Max Benson,OU=Sales,DC=cpandl,DC=com 12/31/2006
dsget succeeded

Here, accounts without expiration dates have an account expires value of “never” and other accounts have a specific expiration date, such as 11/15/2006.

If you need to extend or change the account expiration date to allow a user to log on to the domain, you can do this with DSMOD USER. Set the –Acctexpires parameter to the number of days for which the account should be valid. For example, if an account should be valid for the next 60 days, you would type –acctexpires 60, such as

dsquery user -name johnw | dsmod user -acctexpires 60

or

dsmod user "CN=John Wood,OU=Sales,DC=cpandl,DC=com" -acctexpires 60

In these examples you change the account expiration for John Wood.

If you want to remove an account expiration date, use a value of 0 to specify that the account never expires, such as

dsquery user -name johnw | dsmod user -acctexpires 0
Note

To set an account so that it is past the expiration date, you can type a negative value, such as –acctexpires -1.

Controlling and Resetting User Passwords

Using DSGET USER, you can check the password settings on user accounts. Typically, you’ll want to know if a user can change their password, whether the password expires and whether the password uses reversible encryption. You can check for these settings using the –Canchpwd, –Pwdneverexpires, and –Reversiblepwd parameters respectively. You might also want to know if the account is set so the user must change his or her password on next logon. To do this, you can use the –Mustchpwd parameter. For example, if you wanted to check these values all user accounts in the Users container, you can type

dsquery user "CN=Users,DC=cpandl,DC=com" | dsget user -samid -canchpwd 
-pwdneverexpires - reversiblepwd -mustchpwd

The resulting output would show you the related password settings of each account in the Users container according to the SAM account name, such as

  Samid     mustchpwd     canchpwd    reversiblepwd    pwdneverexpires
andya no yes no no
billg no yes no no
bobh yes yes no no
brianw no yes no no
conniej no yes yes yes
dsget succeeded

DSMOD USER provides several parameters for controlling these and other password settings. You can use the –Pwd parameter to set the password for a particular user account. You can then configure how the password is used as follows:

  • Use –mustchpwd yes to force users to change the password after their next logon.

  • Use –canchpwd no to set the account so users can’t change the password for their account.

  • Use –pwdneverexpires no to set the account so that the password never expires, which overrides Group Policy settings.

The wonderful thing about the command line is that you can control passwords for many user accounts as easily as for one user. Say you wanted to change the password for every user in the TempEmployee OU to Time2ChangeMe and force these users to change their passwords on next logon, you can do this by typing the command

dsquery user "OU=TempEmployee,DC=cpandl,DC=com" | dsmod user -pwd 
Time2ChangeMe - mustchpwd yes

Moving User Accounts

User accounts are normally placed in the Users container or in OUs. You can move a user account to a different container or OU within its current domain using DSMOVE. Specify the user account’s current DN and then use the –Newparent parameter to specify the new location or parent DN of the user account. For instance if you wanted to move the William Stanek user account from the Tech OU to the Engineering OU, you would specify the user account’s DN, such as “CN=William Stanek,OU=Tech,DC=cpandl,DC=com”, and provide the parent DN for the new location, such as “OU=Engineering,DC=cpandl, DC=com”. The related command would look like this:

dsmove "CN=William Stanek,OU=Tech,DC=cpandl,DC=com" -newparent 
"OU=Engineering,DC=cpandl,DC=com"

You could have also obtained the user account DN using the DSQUERY USER command. To do this, you simply pipe the output of DSQUERY USER to DSMOVE, as shown in this example:

dsquery user -name "William Stanek" | dsmove -newparent 
"OU=Engineering,DC=cpandl,DC=com"

Here, the user account DN, “CN=William Stanek,OU=Tech,DC=cpandl, DC=com”, is obtained from DSQUERY USER and used as input to DSMOVE.

Renaming User Accounts

Although moving user accounts is fairly straightforward, you don’t want to rename user accounts without some planning. When you rename a user account, you give the account a new common name. You’ll find that you might have to rename accounts in cases of marriage, divorce, or adoption. For example, if Nancy Anderson (nancya) gets married, she might want her user name to be changed to Nancy Buchanan (nancyb). When you rename her account, all associated privileges and permissions will reflect the name change. Thus, if you view the permissions on a file that nancya had access to, nancyb will now have access (and nancya will no longer be listed).

You rename user accounts using the DSMOVE command. Specify the user’s DN and then use the –Newname parameter to specify the new common name. You can rename a user object from Nancy Anderson to Nancy Buchanan by typing

dsmove "CN=Nancy Anderson,OU=Marketing,DC=cpandl,DC=com" -newname 
"Nancy Buchanan"

You could obtain the user DN by means of DSQUERY USER as well. Consider the following example:

dsquery user -name N*Anderson | dsmove -newname "Nancy Buchanan"

Here you use DSQUERY USER to find an account that begins with the letters “N” and ends with “Anderson.” You then use DSMOVE to rename this account.

Renaming the user account doesn’t change any of the other account properties. Because some properties may reflect the old last name, you will need to update these properties to reflect the name change using DSMOD USER. The parameters you might want to modify include

  • Ln Used to change the last name for the user account.

  • Display Used to change the user account’s Display Name.

  • Samid Used to change the SAM account name.

  • Profile Used to change the profile path for the account. Afterward, you’ll need to rename the corresponding directory on disk.

  • Loscr If you use individual logon scripts for each user, you can use –Loscr to change the logon script name property. Afterward, you’ll need to rename the logon script on disk.

  • Hmdir Used to change the home directory path. Afterward, you’ll need to rename the corresponding directory on disk.

Note

In most cases, you won’t want to modify this information while a user is logged on because this might cause problems. Instead, update this information after hours or ask the user to log off for a few minutes and then log back on.

Consider the following example:

dsquery user -name N*Buchanan | dsmod -samid nancyb -ln Buchanan 
-display Nancy Buchanan

Here, you change the SAM account name, last name and display name to match the previous name change for the user Nancy Buchanan.

Real World

User names are used to make managing and using accounts easier. Behind the scenes, Windows Server 2003 actually uses the account’s security identifier (SID) to identify, track, and handle the account independently from the user name. SIDs are unique identifiers that are generated when accounts are created. Because SIDs are mapped to account names internally, you don’t need to change the privileges or permissions on renamed accounts. Windows Server 2003 simply maps the SID to the new account name as necessary.

Deleting User Accounts

If you no longer need a user account, you can delete it permanently from Active Directory using the DSRM command. In most cases, you’ll want to delete only a specific user account, such as the account for Mary Baker. If this is the case, you remove the account by passing DSRM the DN of the user account, such as

dsrm "CN=Mary Baker,OU=Sales,DC=cpandl,DC=com"

By default, DSRM prompts you to confirm the deletion. If you don’t want to see the prompt use the –Noprompt parameter, such as

dsrm "CN=Mary Baker,OU=Sales,DC=cpandl,DC=com" -noprompt
Note

Even though you delete a user’s account, Windows Server 2003 won’t delete the user’s profile, personal files, or home directory. If you want to delete these files and directories, you’ll have to do it manually. If this is a task you perform routinely, you might want to create a script that performs the necessary tasks for you. Keep in mind you should back up files or data that might be needed before you do this.

 

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Dealing with Cyberbullies – Cyber Security Tip

Cyber Security Tip ST06-005

Dealing with Cyberbullies

Bullies are taking advantage of technology to intimidate and harass their victims.

Dealing with cyberbullying can be difficult, but there are steps you can take.

What is cyberbullying?

Cyberbullying refers to practice of using technology to harass, or bully, someone else.

Bullies used to be restricted to methods such as physical intimidation, postal mail, or the telephone.

Now, developments in electronic media offer forums such as email, instant messaging, web pages, and digital photos to add to the arsenal. Computers, cell phones, and PDAs are current tools that are being used to conduct an old practice.

Forms of cyberbullying can range in severity from cruel or embarrassing rumors to threats, harassment, or stalking. It can affect any age group; however, teenagers and young adults are common victims, and cyberbullying is a growing problem in schools.

Why has cyberbullying become such a problem?

The relative anonymity of the internet is appealing for bullies because it enhances the intimidation and makes tracing the activity more difficult. Some bullies also find it easier to be more vicious because there is no personal contact.

Unfortunately, the internet and email can also increase the visibility of the activity. Information or pictures posted online or forwarded in mass emails can reach a larger audience faster than more traditional methods, causing more damage to the victims.

And because of the amount of personal information available online, bullies may be able to arbitrarily choose their victims.

Cyberbullying may also indicate a tendency toward more serious behavior. While bullying has always been an unfortunate reality, most bullies grow out of it.

Cyberbullying has not existed long enough to have solid research, but there is evidence that it may be an early warning for more violent behavior.

How can you protect yourself or your children?

Teach your children good online habits – Explain the risks of technology, and teach children how to be responsible online.

Reduce their risk of becoming cyberbullies by setting guidelines for and monitoring their use of the internet and other electronic media (cell phones, PDAs, etc.).

Keep lines of communication open – Regularly talk to your children about their online activities so that they feel comfortable telling you if they are being victimized.

Watch for warning signs – If you notice changes in your child’s behavior, try to identify the cause as soon as possible. If cyberbullying is involved; acting early can limit the damage.

Limit availability of personal information – Limiting the number of people who have access to contact information or details about interests, habits, or employment reduces exposure to bullies that you or your child do not know. This may limit the risk of becoming a victim and may make it easier to identify the bully if you or your child are victimized.

Avoid escalating the situation – Responding with hostility is likely to provoke a bully and escalate the situation. Depending on the circumstances, consider ignoring the issue. Often, bullies thrive on the reaction of their victims. Other options include subtle actions. For example, you may be able to block the messages on social networking sites or stop unwanted emails by changing the email address. If you continue to get messages at the new email address, you may have a stronger case for legal action.

Document the activity – Keep a record of any online activity (emails, web pages, instant messages, etc.), including relevant dates and times.

In addition to archiving an electronic version, consider printing a copy.

Report cyberbullying to the appropriate authorities – If you or your childcare being harassed or threatened, report the activity. Many schools have instituted bullying programs, so school officials may have established policies for dealing with activity that involves students.

If necessary, contact your local law enforcement. Law enforcement agencies have different policies, but your local police department or FBI branch are good starting points. Unfortunately, there is a distinction between free speech and punishable offenses, but the legal implications should be decided by the law enforcement officials and the prosecutors.

 

Additional information, the following organizations offer additional information about this topic:

National Crime Prevention Council – http://www.ncpc.org/cyberbullying

StopBullying.gov – http://www.stopbullying.gov/

 


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